Plenty of products have graced the pages of DRUM! over the past 20 years with the promise of becoming the next great percussive innovation. For better or worse, not all survived. Here are a few we remember fondly and have left us – and no doubt their creators – forever wondering what might have been ...

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Peavey tried to reinvent drum shell design. Turns out drummers like counterhoops.

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Bikers loved this stick accessory. Too bad drummers didn’t.

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For a moment, companies thought drummers wanted to look like jazz dancers. Few did. Plus, who wants to put on shoes that Dennis Chambers already wore?

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A cure for the agony of learning proper technique.

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“Imagine it! Hi-hat,cymbals, bass, snare and toms – all electronic!” Unfortunately, in 1992, few could. These folks were way ahead of the times.

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Everybody tried to market a compact drum kit during the ’90s, including Remo.

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For a brief period, Practa Pal ruled the practice pad roost.

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Honestly, can you figure out what’s going on here? Anyone? That poor hi-hat looks like it’s in traction.

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In fact, this product was a great idea, but sadly came and went quicker than Chad Smith’s angelic innocence.

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Believe it or not, stick grip wraps were a real fad for a while there in the ’90s. Not, like, grunge music big, but ya know ...

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Carmine Appice tried his hand at custom snare wires years before Puresound’s debut.

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Kaman launched the Legend drum brand with a flourish, but high prices knocked it out of the market.

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Camber was a tasty brand of budget cymbals, secretly made by Sabian.

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This stick company showed tons of promise, but bad management killed the brand. Guess what – it’s back! And with JRabb himself in charge, we have high hopes.

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Also for a brief period, Pad L copied Practa Pal’s strap-on pad concept. Someone must have cried sacrilege. Or was it sacrileg?

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Mapex drew lots of attention for this bass drum/hi-hat hybrid pedal, but eventually kicked the idea to the curb.

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Vruk tried to make heel-toe technique dreams come true.

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We’ve heard of being flat-footed, but these guys took the idea too literally.

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