Learn The Music. Ask what you need to learn for the audition and get the music ahead of time. Find out as much as possible about what they are looking for, and try and do as much as you can to prepare. Learn the drum parts and the arrangements as closely as possible to the version on the CDs or tapes that they give you. You never know what they are looking for, but that’s a good starting point. Get into the vibe of the music as much as possible so that everything you play comes from that vibe.

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Be Creative. If possible, come up with your own creative ideas about how you would interpret the drum parts, in case you get an opportunity to show them that you are creative and can bring something to the table. But consider who you are auditioning for. Don’t overplay on a gig that demands a less-is-more approach to playing the music.

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Write Charts Or Memorize. Write out the charts for each song as detailed as possible, or memorize the drum parts to each song as perfectly as you can. Learn the form of each song. For example: Intro 1 - verse 1 - pre chorus 1 - chorus 1, and so on. Even try and learn the lyrics of each song. This way you really know the song.

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Bring The Right Tools. Find out what you need to bring to the audition. Always have your bass drum pedals, snare, and sticks, but also bring your own drum throne, hi-hats, ride, and favorite crash in case you have time to set up additional equipment.

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Be On Time. Definitely don’t be late. That will make you look unprofessional and unreliable. Appear confident, easy to get along with, and happy to be there, especially to the artist and the management (or whoever is in charge). You will be judged not only by your playing but how you appear and how you act.

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Appearance. Dress as yourself, but consider the band you are auditioning for.

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Be Professional. Be responsible, friendly, honest, and someone that appears to be a team player with a good attitude, someone that everyone will want to be around for an extended time on the road in a bus or plane. Be willing to serve the music and be able to listen and take suggestions and even criticism.