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Nightmare Gigs

Posted: May 24, 2011 10:02 PM

john lamb

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Rev.D. - 29 September 2010 03:34 PM

even though I never actually met a “mean” biker

I have!!!  @ one gig for the local biker gang,  I saw 2 bikers holding down a 3rd.  He wanted to cut the band,  just for something to do.  They were trying real hard to talk him out of it.  These were all BIG dudes. 

Never played for the Hells Angels, but I did a few shows for the Outlaws a while back and they were pretty stone-faced as well.  I didn’t see this, but the owner dragged out guy out of the bar while holding a knife behind his back…  and was driving the dudes bike the next day :o   Good times.

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Posted: November 11, 2011 09:52 AM

thumperfoot

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I showed up to a wedding gig about a hundred miles away from home and reached in the back seat to find that I had left my stick bag at home. Fortunately, I found one ragged 5B in the bag of percussion stuff. The soundman took off across the 9th fairway into the woods and came back with an old, cured and hardened tree branch and asked if I could play with it. I said something to the effect of, “Does the Pope wear a funny hat?” and did all three sets with that motley pair.
The moral of that story: ALWAYS have sticks stashed away in trap cases, under car seats, in the trunk, etc.

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Half o’dozen to one, square root of 36 to another.

Posted: January 11, 2012 12:22 PM

PhantomDrums

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Not quite an equipment failure…much worse…

Was touring Europe with a musical and caught the flu. Passed out ONSTAGE during the performance. (The band was on a moving band car that would travel downstage and upstage.) Woke up in the emergency room and ended up having missed two shows.

Felt horrible about what happened because the band had a huge rock number in which we all took pre-set 16 bar solos. Because I passed out in the middle of the act, 10 minutes before we were to play this number,  the band had to improvise at that moment. To this day I never found out who took over my 16 bars or if they just frantically sent panicked eye signals to each other to cover, as the music was non stop thru out the performance.

Hard lesson learned; take better care of yourself and have a contingency plan for such emergencies. None of us prepared for something like this and we should have known better because the cast had gotten colds since first setting foot in Germany and the understudies were overworked the first two weeks we were there. Yikes!

Posted: June 19, 2012 07:58 PM

Andy Doerschuk

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One of my very first paid gigs, I believe when I was in sixth grade, was playing at the NCO Club in Ankara, Turkey on New Years Eve. I was playing in a band with a bunch of adult airmen for a roomful of other drunken airmen and a lot of lady friends (from whence they came, I cannot say).

I remember at one point watching one airman slow dancing with a woman (probably to “Knights In White Satin,” or something like that), as he gradually hiked up her already revealing miniskirt. My unprepared 12-year-old mind was dumbstruck. With all of its excessive drinking, blatant sexual innuendo, and general partying, that night immediately ranked as the wildest scene I had ever personally witnessed in my preteen existence.

Rather than sitting on a proper drum throne, I sat on a wooden stool — the kind you’d buy at an unfinished furniture store back in the day. As the crowd’s frenzy was peaking, the bandleader called “Wipeout” – my big moment at my first real, paying gig. I launched into the solo with extra gusto, thrashing and gyrating to the famous sixteenth-note snare drum pattern when, after several bars, my stool suddenly began to feel wobbly. It then collapsed altogether, sending me off the back of my little drum riser. Everything stopped as I disappeared from view.

The audience tried to peer over the back of my drum riser as the sudden quietness caught their attention. I slowly crawled back up, grabbed a nearby bar chair (which put the top snare hoop just about parallel with my chin), and finished the solo. The dancers went back to dancing, and I played the rest of the set with a red face and a story I would tell for the rest of my life.

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Andy Doerschuk
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Posted: June 19, 2012 08:14 PM

Andy Doerschuk

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Check out the feature I posted today about the worst gigs experienced by such pro players as Carl Palmer, Carmine Appice, and Deen Castronovo.

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Andy Doerschuk
Editorial director, drummagazine.com

Posted: June 24, 2012 08:11 AM

vfujidrums

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Wow man, what a crazy day!!!
After that the cops didn’t take you as a suspect?, lol

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