Does Polishing off Cymbal Ink Affect Value?

Posted: July 01, 2012 12:19 PM

Medium Size Dog

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When polishing cymbals, does removing logos and ink stamps affect value or future value of the cymbals? I also don’t need to be a billboard displaying a bunch of logos. The sound is the value to me, not the money. The code etched into the cymbal provides positive ID for someone who really wants to know. Zildjians newer than a certain age have info etched, not stamped like older ones. Can someone tell me how to read the serial number code? Does the 96 mean 1996? Also, if you know the difference between a malfoof and a cuica, please see the mediumsizedog channel on youtube. Thanks.

     
Posted: July 01, 2012 12:35 PM

Andy Doerschuk

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Wow. Lots of good questions! I’ll get in touch with my contacts at Zildjian about your code question, and will contact my friend Dror Sinai at Rhythm Fusion about the malfoof definition. Otherwise, I believe that a minority of cymbals increase in value over time, and really need to have historical significance to become collectible. In fact, most actually decrease in value unless they are kept in pristine condition. But I generally think that cymbals are not an especially good investment as collectibles, so just play them, polish them, and enjoy.

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Andy Doerschuk
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Posted: July 01, 2012 01:44 PM

Medium Size Dog

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Thanks so much for your quick reply. Some google fishing taught me that those first two numbers are the year, other numbers are the type and the cymbal’s unique number in the production run. Also, Andy, it’s great that you’re right there actually answering within minutes. Great magazine, I love the Hand Drum Section.Keep it up and I’ll keep subscribing!Thanks

Posted: July 02, 2012 01:09 PM

bigbeat

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Like Andy said, cymbals are not great financail investments. Only the old ones seem to be worth serious $, and those looking know what they are without labels.

I say leave the labels on until you’re sure it’s a keeper. If you deside to get rid of a newer cymbal, the label can help sell it. Once you know it’s yours forever, clean the label off.

I’m with you- no need to advertise & half the logos are too big & ugly.

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loud is my forte

Posted: July 26, 2012 12:22 AM

Skulmoski

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I’ve removed all the labels from my cymbals; most are just plain ugly. I mix and match cymbals; I have Sabian, vintage A’s, Agop and Spizzichinos in my setup. Gradually, they are attracting the patina I like.

Most of the cymbals made today are mass produced, machine made and machine lathed/hammered and built for the masses. These are not likely candidates for a healthy financial ROI. On the other hand, custom, hand lathed and hammered cymbals can be great candidates for investments. Just look at the prices of Spizzichino cymbals in the last year to confirm that first rate hand crafted cymbals by a true artisan can be a good investment. Craig Lauritsen is another cymbal maker who has my respect and is making first class cymbals.

GJS