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Your Favorite stick

Posted: September 10, 2010 09:34 AM

Warren Wright

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I have played the Pro-Mark Oak sticks for years and for the past 3 or 4 years, I centered my choice to the Pro-Mark 727 Wood Tip Oaks.

They are roughly the weight of an 8A stick but are longer and for anyone who has played Hickory sticks knows,  power rim shots will destroy a stick very quickly but with the Oak sticks, one pair of Oak sticks will outlast 4 to 6 pair of Hickory sticks hands down. 
I play at least 10 gigs a month, every month, and one pair will easily last anywhere between 1 and 2 months before the power rim shots have put enough dents in the stick to make it rough to hold.  Ive only broken 3 sticks since I started playing them. 
They are a bit heavier in weight than the hickory but hey, you get more volume than with Hickory and you get a lot more use as well.

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I am a Drummer…its not only what I do…its also an integral part of who I am

Posted: September 18, 2010 09:08 PM

NickMason

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Rev.D. - 08 September 2010 09:10 AM

I used to use Ahead sticks exclusively. I had 9 pair of the Tommy Lee model.  The plastic sleeves would wear down rather quickly and the aluminum underneath would make contact with my cymbals and crack them. I eventually went back to wood sticks because replacing wood sticks is a lot cheaper than replacing Ziljian K crashes. But than again, back then I did used to beat my drums like they owed me money.

If you change the covers before the sleeves wear to the point of showing the aluminum you would never have any problems with cracking cymbals…

I use Ahead sticks, and I can tell you this, I break a lot less cymbals then when I used wood sticks. The Plastic sleeve is softer than wood and will do less damage to your gear, but you have to keep up on changing the covers.

I currently use the Ahead Maxum Model. (16.5” x .595”)
I started with the Tommy Lee’s, then moved to the Tico Torres, and now down to the Maxum. I keep searching for a lighter stick. I tried a set of 5B Light Rocks recently and I loved them, but they broke way to fast on me. With the Maxums I have yet to break one in the last 9 months I have been working with them.

On lighter gigs, Jazz and Blues I’ll use the 5AB Hybrid Concert or 5As. But 9 out of 10 gigs I am playing Rock so they don’t get much use wink

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nickmason.org

Posted: September 24, 2010 12:46 PM

guarilio989

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Andy Doerschuk - 08 September 2010 11:47 AM

A number of years went by until Carbosticks made its debut with what appeared to be an almost identical formulation. Apparently, they’re still in business although I rarely see them in stores. Truth is, I never gave carbon fiber sticks a proper road test, and can’t account for their durability, but if you’re looking for an alternative to wood, you might want to give them a smack or two.

Do you happen to know where I could find those sticks? I’d love to try them

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Hit Hard, Play Fast, Have Fun

Posted: September 24, 2010 04:10 PM

Andy Doerschuk_1

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I just conducted a search and found a bunch of sites selling them including, strangely, Amazon! Here’s the link:

http://www.amazon.com/Carbosticks-Carbon-Drumsticks-Medium-Weight/dp/B000Q53DEO

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Andy Doerschuk
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Posted: September 24, 2010 05:52 PM

Rev.D.

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NickMason - 18 September 2010 09:08 PM
Rev.D. - 08 September 2010 09:10 AM

I used to use Ahead sticks exclusively. I had 9 pair of the Tommy Lee model.  The plastic sleeves would wear down rather quickly and the aluminum underneath would make contact with my cymbals and crack them. I eventually went back to wood sticks because replacing wood sticks is a lot cheaper than replacing Ziljian K crashes. But than again, back then I did used to beat my drums like they owed me money.

If you change the covers before the sleeves wear to the point of showing the aluminum you would never have any problems with cracking cymbals…

 

 

 

That’s why I broke so many cymbals. I played heavy Rock at the time. Brand new sleeves would wear down halfway through a set and changing sleeves during a set is not an option(the process is ridiculously long). So it was easier to switch to wood.

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A good drummer will sound good on anything. A Bad drummer will sound bad on anything.

Posted: September 26, 2010 10:50 AM

NickMason

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That’s why I broke so many cymbals. I played heavy Rock at the time. Brand new sleeves would wear down halfway through a set and changing sleeves during a set is not an option(the process is ridiculously long). So it was easier to switch to wood.


Hmmmmm…. Never seen that before unless your chopping at your cymbals.

I mean, I have to change the covers after every gig, but a fresh pair will last me the whole night, and I have never had the problem of the plastic wearing down so much that the metal was exposed…

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nickmason.org

Posted: September 26, 2010 02:18 PM

Rev.D.

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Well, since I can’t find the Vater DSK’s locally, I’m thinking about just getting the Vater Power 5A’s or XD-5A’s.

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A good drummer will sound good on anything. A Bad drummer will sound bad on anything.

Posted: September 29, 2010 10:25 PM

Dan Cunningham

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Andy Doerschuk - 08 September 2010 11:47 AM
bashboomcrash - 08 September 2010 08:58 AM

Has anyone had any experience with the Ahead sticks?

I haven’t had much luck with synthetic sticks. If they’re made of a plastic compound, they usually feel too rubbery in my hands. Aluminum feels too stiff. (This is beginning to sound like Goldilocks!) The only synthetic sticks that ever felt comfortable in both weight and balance are a unique and rare genre made of carbon fiber. The first time I came across carbon fiber sticks was back in the early ’90s with an L.A.-based company called Mainline. They had a pink hue and felt remarkably like wood in both weight and balance. The company made them for a few years, but finally discontinued them (we were told that manufacturing costs made them prohibitive). A number of years went by until Carbosticks made its debut with what appeared to be an almost identical formulation. Apparently, they’re still in business although I rarely see them in stores. Truth is, I never gave carbon fiber sticks a proper road test, and can’t account for their durability, but if you’re looking for an alternative to wood, you might want to give them a smack or two.


I have a pair of the mainline sticks that I got from my uncle when I started playing drums seven years ago. They are 5A’s but they are about the size of a Vic Firth 8d. They have a good amount of weight to them for their size (more like the weight of standard 5A’s or 5B’s). It’s almost like a carbon fiber mixed with sawdust. I really liked them, but after a while, instead of pieces chipping off of the shoulder of the stick it got fury. The tip of the stick also got fury, which lead to horrible stick definition on the ride. I’m very surprized, I have never been able to find any information on the mainline sticks. So after they began to resemble a pair of pink fuzzy slippers I never used them agian.
I started out using various Vic Firth sizes 7A’s then 8d’s then 5A’s always nylon tips.
I always seemed to shred them up too much. They wouldn’t break often, the shoulder would just get really thin.
So a tried a few pairs of Ahead sticks. They were ok, but I would loose all feel and finesse.
Then I started searching around on different stick manufacturers websites for my perfect stick. And right now that stick is the Pro-Mark 747 nylon tip(hickory or oak when I have the extra buck a pair). I love these sticks because they are in between a 7A’s and 5A’s diameter and are 16 and 1/4 inches with a short taper for a nice beefy shoulder. Also I get alot of feel from these sticks, almost like they are really long fingers as wierd as that sounds, I hope you get it.

So hopefully that was helpfull for some of you. I have never contributed to a forum before so I’m sorry if I seemed to ramble a bit.

Posted: October 14, 2010 07:32 AM

bigbeat

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I used to use Zildjian 6A. I think Zildjian is the only company making them. Wood round tip. Good stick.
Recently I got a deal on some no name sticks. 12 pair of $12. They actually felt OK, 5A wood acorn tip. I was truly impressed with there durability. (Haven’t we all tried cheap stick that break easily). The problem actual arose that instead of breaking, they started warping. I’m talking banana curves. One is so bad, I started thinking about the stick, and not the music. Not a good thing at a gig.
I wonder it the curving has anything to do with the moister content like the dude from Vater mentioned. As the sticks continued to dry out, they bent?

Time to go back to a reliable brand name.

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loud is my forte

Posted: January 19, 2011 10:42 AM

Dreeddrums

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Andy Doerschuk - 07 September 2010 08:31 AM

I wrote to Alan Vater and asked if he could explain how moisture content changes the way a stick feels in your hand. Here’s what he had to say:

“Wood is cellulose fiber and water. The more water you extract out of the cellulose fiber the weaker and lighter the wood. The opposite is also true — the more moisture you leave in the wood the stronger and heavier the wood. Vater kiln dries its hickory to 10% to 12% moisture. Some of our competitors use a furniture drying schedule that is 6% to 8%. Vater Drumsticks have a tendency to feel a little heavier then other brands, and this higher moisture content is why.”

Thank you so much sorry it took me so long to reply, its been a crazy holiday season.  I noticed the valter ad. Changed a bit,and im definitely going to have to try those carbon fiber sticks out. You guys are the best, I love the new issue, the hall of famers and congrats on the milestone

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I consider every drummer that’s Played before me an influence, in every way- buddie rich

Posted: January 19, 2011 11:23 AM

Andy Doerschuk_1

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Thanks! Glad to help.

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Andy Doerschuk
Editorial director, drummagazine.com

Posted: February 05, 2011 09:53 AM

paddlepro

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Vater Hickory nylon tip New orleans jazz.

Posted: April 04, 2011 02:31 AM

Warren Wright

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The only stick Ive played in years is the Pro-Mark 727 Wood Tip Oak.  It will outlast 5 or 6 pairs of Hickory and with fine sandpaper, the little cymbal nicks will come out easily which extends the life of them quite a bit.  I dont break sticks so suffice it to say; A 12 pair “Brick” will last me at least a year at least, playing 10 to 12 gigs a month and at the end of that year, I have a drummer buddy of mine who loads up the most worn sticks, uses the sandpaper on em and continues to use em.  They are Tough Sticks

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I am a Drummer…its not only what I do…its also an integral part of who I am

Posted: May 13, 2011 04:10 PM

Rev.D.

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I am thinking about switching to either Vater DSK’s, or Vic Firth American Classic Metal N’s.

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A good drummer will sound good on anything. A Bad drummer will sound bad on anything.

Posted: June 22, 2011 09:49 AM

bitchAboutIt

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Has anybody tried out Hornets? www.hornetsdrumsticks.com
I wonder how they feel/sound. Their hot rods look really nice.

   
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