Tiger Bill: 4-Limb Speed and Coordination - Part 2

Tiger Bill Lesson: 4-Limb Speed and Coordination - Part 2

Last time we worked on one of the most basic but critical techniques in drumming, which is the ability to coordinate your hands perfectly with your feet. If you missed that one, please work on it first. This second part of that lesson will be much easier to perform once you have worked on the first part. (You'll find it online at DrumMagazine.com/Lessons.)

Video Lesson

This time we're taking 4 limb speed and coordination to the next level by alternating our hands and feet while applying the single stroke roll pattern to our two core exercises.

The Practice Key in Exercise 1 gives you four variations. The first has you playing a single stroke roll pattern in your hands and the second has you applying the single stroke roll pattern to your feet. The third variation has you repeating the first two variations but starting the single stroke roll with your left hand and left foot instead of your right hand and right foot.

The Practice Key in Exercise 2 gives you four combinations for coordinating all 4 limbs at the same time. They are as follows:

Apply RLRL sticking with both your hands and feet.
Apply LRLR sticking with both your hands and feet.
Apply RLRL as follows: For each R, play a right hand and left foot stroke in sync. For each L, play a left hand and right foot stroke in sync.
Apply LRLR as follows: For each L, play a left hand and right foot stroke in sync. For each R, play a right hand and left foot stroke in sync.

Note that the third and fourth variation above are what I refer to as "cross-wiring" your brain for coordination. Especially if you are new to 4-way coordination drills, you will find variations 1 and 2 easier to play up to speed than the third and fourth ones. This is because we are naturally more coordinated when moving both of our right limbs and both left limbs together in sync. It is more difficult to move your right hand and left foot in sync and your left hand and right foot in sync. This requires a new set of neuropathways to be built, which is what I refer to as cross-wiring. The good news is that, with enough practice on these drills, you will soon be able to sync any combination of limbs with ease. Watch the demo video for more.

Tips for Easier Practice

When you first start working on these drills you may find them difficult to play. You'll find them easier to develop if you break them down like this:

Repeat the first bar eight times followed by the second bar eight times. Repeat that sixteen bar phrase over and over until you can easily make a clean transition between the two.
Repeat the second bar eight times followed by the third bar eight times. Repeat that sixteen bar phrase over and over until you can easily make a clean transition.
Repeat the third bar eight times followed by the fourth bar eight times. Repeat that sixteen bar phrase over and over until you can easily make a clean transition.
Repeat the fourth bar eight times followed by the fifth bar eight times. Repeat that sixteen bar phrase over and over until you can easily make a clean transition.
Repeat the fifth bar eight times followed by the sixth bar eight times. Repeat that sixteen bar phrase over and over until you can easily make a clean transition.
Repeat the sixth bar eight times followed by the seventh bar eight times. Repeat that sixteen bar phrase over and over until you can easily make a clean transition.

After you get comfortable practicing those six drills and you begin to build them into your muscle memory, you will eventually find it much easier to play Exercise 1 and 2 straight through as written.

For questions on this month's lesson, don't hesitate to contact me at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Until then, stay loose and have fun!
—Tiger Bill Meligari